Beggar flowers in Pakistan, know when there was a blackout in India too, 400 million people drowned in darkness


On 30 and 31 July 2012, there was a massive power cut in India, which can be termed as the worst power crisis in the history of mankind. The first of the two outages affected approximately 350 million people.

Pakistan, which is facing economic crisis, has lost electricity. Big cities like Islamabad, Lahore and Karachi were seen in darkness. According to the Pakistani newspaper Dawn, two supply lines between Guddu and Quetta in Balochistan were found to be faulty in the morning, after which the grid failed across the country. There was discussion on social media about the power failure in Pakistan and many memes were also shared. Pakistanis cursed their rulers fiercely. #ElectricityShutDown and #Poweroutage remained top trends. Along with this, the discussion also started that can there be a power crisis like Pakistan in India too?

why darkness in pakistan

Pakistan’s Energy Minister Khurram Dastgir has said that the demand for electricity decreases in winter. So, as an economic measure, we temporarily shut down the power generation units at night. When the system was turned on on Monday morning, there were voltage fluctuations between Dadu and Jamshoro in the south of the country, affecting the grid. This is the second time in four months in Pakistan that the entire country’s power grid has come to a standstill in this way.

400 million people were drowned in darkness in 2012

On 30 and 31 July 2012, there was a massive power cut in India, which can be termed as the worst power crisis in the history of mankind. The first of the two outages affected approximately 350 million people, while the second affected 670 million. Its effect was seen in 21 out of 28 Indian states. The important question that needs to be answered is what exactly happened that led to the outage.

Back Bone of Indian Electricity: Power Grid

The electricity network in India is divided into five regional grids namely Northern, North-Eastern, Eastern, Western and Southern regional grids. About two-thirds of the electricity generated in India comes from coal-fired thermal power plants, which are concentrated in the eastern region due to their proximity to major coal mines. Hydro production is mostly located in the northern and north-eastern regions. On the other hand, the major power withdrawal loads are located in the North, West and South regions. This geographically heterogeneous production-consumption profile requires the massive flow of electricity across thousands of miles, to fuel India’s growing economy. On 30 July 2012, a fault occurred in the New Grid, which caused the northern regional grid to be disconnected from the rest of the grid, and eventually 8 out of 28 Indian states were left in darkness. Just 32 hours later, on 31 July 2012, at around 1300 hours, the fault resurfaced, affecting approximately 670 million people. From Jammu-Kashmir, Himachal, Punjab to Delhi, UP, Bihar, Odisha and a total of 22 states of Northeast India were covered in darkness. It was told that 32 GW of power generation capacity had come to a standstill. Power was restored on 1 August 2012.



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